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Username Post: J. Stevens Little Scout .22 14 1/2        (Topic#3493)
unimatrix
newbie
*
05-31-06 11:20 AM - Post#28320    



I am getting ready to move and updating my insurance prices and looking through some of the older weapons in my inventory and came across the little scout .22 and I've been trying to locate more information about the weapons. There are no serial numbers so it's a little hard to find an exact manufacturing date.

The only engravings read:

J. Stevens Arms Company Chicopee Fall, MASS U.S.A. 14 1/2
Little Scout .22 - long rifle PAT July 2-07.

I believe that puts it in the 1911 - 1923 bracket because there is no "SVG" on the left side of the trigger. The only other marking on the weapon is an astrick on the left side of the barrel about half an inch from the breech.

It has been fired before and still works. It gets brought out to the range, or the farm, once a year, a box of .22 shorts put through it, cleaned and stored for another year. As far as I can tell, everything is all original. The barrel has a little corosion on it, but no rust and the barrel appears to still be in good shape. I know my Dad used the gun when he was a kid in the 1940's and that's about it.

I've similar guns listed at the $225 mark and wondered if that was about right for replacement value.
My Grandfather: "If it's not made in Germany or designed by Browning: It's crap!"


 
PAConstable1
Shooter/Master Member
*
Re: J. Stevens Little Scout .22 14 1/2
05-31-06 05:09 PM - Post#28321    


    In response to unimatrix

The J.Stevens Arms Co. model 14 1/2 Little Scout was manufactured from 1911 to 1941 (production was stopped because of the war).

Naturally the actual value of these rifles depends on how well they shoot and how badly someone wants to buy it.

But Insurance Co. insist on exact values so I found two published values you can use.

The first is published in: GUN TRADERS GUIDE Twentyseventh Edition (published by Stoeger Publishing Co.)
NiB $204
Ex $102
Gd $76

The other is published in: STANDARD CATALOG OF FIREARMS, 5th Edition - from the publishers of Gun List.
Exc $275
V.G. $250
Good $225
Fair $175
Poor $125

You decide which condition and value you want to give to the insurance company. And if they qusestion the value you can tell them exactly what book it was published in.
School teaches us the Precious Metals are Gold, Silver, Platinum and Palladium.
Life teaches us they're really Brass, Copper, Lead and Steel.


 
unimatrix
newbie
*
Re: J. Stevens Little Scout .22 14 1/2
05-31-06 07:54 PM - Post#28322    


    In response to PAConstable1

Thank you for the information. I think I am going to stick with $225 as I would call it "good" condition. It still plunks with .22 shorts realy nicely out on the farm. I think .22 longs today are a little different as the ejector doesn't always clear the longer cases. But .22 shorts work well enough.
My Grandfather: "If it's not made in Germany or designed by Browning: It's crap!"


 
PAConstable1
Shooter/Master Member
*
Re: J. Stevens Little Scout .22 14 1/2
06-01-06 06:57 AM - Post#28323    


    In response to unimatrix

Using only .22 Shorts can cause excessive wear to the chamber. This will eventually lead to a 'pit' developing in the chamber. This will cause .22LR casings to bulge and not eject properly.

When your rifle was made .22 Shorts and .22 Longs were the common ammunition in use and it was chambered with that in mind. .22 Long Rifle ( which has just a slightly longer case then the .22 Long) was not very popular at the time your rifle was produced because it was more expensive then the other .22's.

The irony is that the once popular .22 Long are no produced, and the once unpopular .22 Long Rifle is its successor.
School teaches us the Precious Metals are Gold, Silver, Platinum and Palladium.
Life teaches us they're really Brass, Copper, Lead and Steel.


 
locutus
moderator
*
Re: J. Stevens Little Scout .22 14 1/2
06-01-06 10:02 AM - Post#28324    


    In response to PAConstable1

PA,

I must respectfully disagree. The .22 Long was simply a .22LR case with the lighter .22 short bullet.

The .22 ammo of many years ago was loaded with corrosive priming compound, which caused the pitting if the weapon wasn't cleaned thoroughly soon after firing.

Using modern ammo, you could fire tens of thousands of .22 shorts in a .22LR chamber with no ill effect. (assuming you properly maintain anmd clean it, of course)

Some "old timers" that I've known swear that firing .38 Special ammo in a .357 magnum will "ruin it, dang quick!"

I've fired over 50,000 rounds of .38 in my Ruger Security Six, with no ill effect whatsoever. Of course, I clean my gun thoroughly after every firing, even if it's only one round. ( when I carried it on duty, I didn't particularly like revolvers, so I practiced a lot. Had the gun factory rebuilt after 40,000 rounds.)
Take care of your weapon and your weapon will take care of you.

My heros wear dog tags


 
PAConstable1
Shooter/Master Member
*
Re: J. Stevens Little Scout .22 14 1/2
06-01-06 03:50 PM - Post#28325    


    In response to locutus

I seem to remember reading somewhere that originally the Long Rifle case was something like .01" longer.
However the article might have been refuring to only one companies ammunition. It's been so long ago that I read it.
Until fairly recently some manufacturers were still including the warning in their instructions about the use of .22 Shorts possiably causing excessive chamber wear.
School teaches us the Precious Metals are Gold, Silver, Platinum and Palladium.
Life teaches us they're really Brass, Copper, Lead and Steel.


 
Bigdaddy
Moderator/Master Member
*
Re: J. Stevens Little Scout .22 14 1/2
06-01-06 04:38 PM - Post#28326    


    In response to PAConstable1

Here is some information about the ubiquitous .22 caliber bullet that I gleaned from Wikipedia, a free on-line encyclopedia:

Quote:

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

.22 Long is a variety of .22 caliber (5.56 mm) rimfire ammunition. The .22 Long is the second oldest of the surviving rimfire cartridges, dating back to 1871, when it was loaded with a 29 grain (1.9 g) bullet and 5 grains (0.32 g) of black powder, 25% more than the .22 Short it was based on. It was designed for use in revolvers, but was soon chambered in rifles as well. The .22 Long Rifle, a heavier loading of the .22 Long case, appeared in 1887, along with the first smokeless powder loadings of the .22 rimfires.

The .22 Long has the same case length as the vastly more popular .22 Long Rifle, but differs in that the Long Rifle has a significantly heavier bullet, a longer overall length (due to the longer bullet used), and a higher muzzle energy. The .22 Long is essentially obsolete; no new firearms are designed specifically to use it, and the largest 3 producers of .22 Long ammunition ceased production (although it continues to be made by CCI, Aguila, and others). Many .22 Long Rifle guns will chamber and fire the shorter round, though the .22 Long generally does not generate sufficient energy to operate semiautomatic guns. The one prominent survivor of the .22 Long is the .22 CB Long, a long-cased version of the .22 CB.

While the original .22 Long loading used the same powder charge as the .22 Long Rifle, and the .22 Long bullet was significantly lighter, the combination does not result in higher velocities for the .22 Long when fired from a rifle. The large barrel volume to chamber volume of a .22 rimfire rifle means that the powder gasses have expanded as far as they can in well before the muzzle of a normal length rifle barrel, and the light .22 Long bullet doesn't have the inertia of the .22 Long Rifle. This means that the .22 Long bullet (and to a lesser extent the .22 Long Rifle, in most loadings) actually slows down significantly before it exits the barrel. Since the .22 Long Rifle performs as well in a short handgun barrel as the .22 Long does, and outperforms it significantly in a long rifle barrel, the development of the .22 Long Rifle assured the .22 Long's path to obselescence. In a sense, though, descendents of the .22 Long still live on, though they are not sold as such. Hypervelocity loadings of the .22 Long Rifle use bullets as light as 30 grains (1.9 g), and special blends of powder to make full use of a rifle barrel to generate velocities far higher than normal loads, and chamber pressures high enough to cycle semi-automatic firearms reliably. The most well known of these is the CCI Stinger, which actually goes so far as to stretch the case length slightly, so that with the short, light bullet, the overall length is still within the max overall length for the .22 Long Rifle.




Apparently, both of you are right; same case size, but .22 LR has a longer bullet...I declare the winner to be - a tie!!!

Thank you PAConstable1 and Locutus for your information.
Tim Hecht www.iwantthatknife.com


 
PAConstable1
Shooter/Master Member
*
Re: J. Stevens Little Scout .22 14 1/2
06-01-06 04:56 PM - Post#28327    


    In response to locutus

Hey locutus! Should we continue to duke this out or should we go over to Bigdaddys house and pound on him instead?
School teaches us the Precious Metals are Gold, Silver, Platinum and Palladium.
Life teaches us they're really Brass, Copper, Lead and Steel.


 
locutus
moderator
*
Re: J. Stevens Little Scout .22 14 1/2
06-01-06 07:29 PM - Post#28328    


    In response to PAConstable1

Quote:

Hey locutus! Should we continue to duke this out or should we go over to Bigdaddys house and pound on him instead?




Take care of your weapon and your weapon will take care of you.

My heros wear dog tags


 
Bigdaddy
Moderator/Master Member
*
Re: J. Stevens Little Scout .22 14 1/2
06-02-06 12:23 AM - Post#28329    


    In response to locutus

Hmmmm. conspiracy to assault a federal officer.....

Isn't research on the internet fun?


Tim Hecht www.iwantthatknife.com


 
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